Bloomsday at the Knockdown Center

I'm thrilled to be performing in a beautiful vocal piece written by Paul Pinto on June. 16th, 2015

                                   Bloomsday  This event will celebrate James Joyce’s  Ulysses  as the “enraptured paean to the world of the physical senses.” The novel takes place over the course of a single day, June 16, 1904, with 18 episodes that correspond to Homer’s Odyssey. Each of the 18 chapters of the book will be transformed into installations of art objects, structures, sounds, videos, performance, food, and more. Our Bloomsday will be an ambulatory experience that will mirror Joyce’s prose in all its juicy, uncompromising, vulnerable, fragmented, and synesthetic confusion.  Participants include:  Abraham Adams, Sonel Breslav (Blonde Art Books), Ashton Cooper, Maggie Craig (Papercut Press), Simon Critchley, Anthony Cudahy, Moze Halperin, Kelsey Harrison, Bethany Ides, Victoria Keddie and Scott Kiernan (E.S.P. TV) Jillian McManemin, Marrek Milde and Kristyna Milde, Claire Mirocha and Vanessa Thill (Sorry Archive), Paul Pino (PAULAPART), Paul Pinto, Nicole Reber, Zefrey Throwell, H. Weaver, Chloe Wyma, Alex Zandi  Reading table organized by Blonde Art Books with contributions from Ugly Duckling Presse, Molasses Books, Mellow Pages Library and more.  All are welcome. Email vanessa@knockdown.center for more info.     June 16, 6pm – 10pm 2015   

 

                               Bloomsday

This event will celebrate James Joyce’s Ulysses as the “enraptured paean to the world of the physical senses.” The novel takes place over the course of a single day, June 16, 1904, with 18 episodes that correspond to Homer’s Odyssey. Each of the 18 chapters of the book will be transformed into installations of art objects, structures, sounds, videos, performance, food, and more. Our Bloomsday will be an ambulatory experience that will mirror Joyce’s prose in all its juicy, uncompromising, vulnerable, fragmented, and synesthetic confusion.

Participants include:

Abraham Adams, Sonel Breslav (Blonde Art Books), Ashton Cooper, Maggie Craig (Papercut Press), Simon Critchley, Anthony Cudahy, Moze Halperin, Kelsey Harrison, Bethany Ides, Victoria Keddie and Scott Kiernan (E.S.P. TV) Jillian McManemin, Marrek Milde and Kristyna Milde, Claire Mirocha and Vanessa Thill (Sorry Archive), Paul Pino (PAULAPART), Paul Pinto, Nicole Reber, Zefrey Throwell, H. Weaver, Chloe Wyma, Alex Zandi

Reading table organized by Blonde Art Books with contributions from Ugly Duckling Presse, Molasses Books, Mellow Pages Library and more.

All are welcome. Email vanessa@knockdown.center for more info.

 

June 16, 6pm – 10pm
2015

 

THE UPPER ROOM

New Ohio Theatre and Rady&Bloom present

THE UPPER ROOM

Written and directed by Jeremy Bloom and Brian Rady
Music by Catherine Brookman

MAY 22 - JUNE 12
TUES - SAT at 8 PM
 

"The infectious high spirits that this company brings are downright inspirational.” - NYTheater.com
 

The Upper Room is a new play with original music inspired by the back-to-the-land movement. Set on an island way off the north coast of Maine, the last participants of a once thriving commune meet the sea. Anxious and restless, the quorum gathers around the table in their upper room to confront the rising water and certain members’ curious ailments. A darkly humorous consideration of spirituality and the dangers of our changing environment combines with a live mixed score, antique scuba suits and an overhead projector to create a brand new music theater event.

Running time: 90 minutes, no intermission

Featuring: Catherine Brookman*, Tjasa Ferme, Dana Kaplan-Angle, Govind Kumar, Robert Gadol Lavenstein, Joyce Miller, Stacy Ayn Price, Julia Sirna-Frest*, Heather Thiry, featuring Joe White (guitar)

Ancient Lives at The Kitchen

In Half Straddle’s Kitchen debut, writer/director Tina Satter merges teen movie influences from the late 80s, a live mixed score, and video landscape to create a brand new coming of age narrative. A teacher leads three students away from society. When they start an alternative TV station in the woods and meet a young witch who alters the group dynamic, their fragile new family begins to fray. Seventeenth-century captivity narratives, adolescent letters of Emily Dickinson, the teen movies, and more infect this darkly humorous consideration of how we make meaning for ourselves and our communities.

January 7-10 and 14–17, 8pm

Tickets $20

Half Straddle: Ancient Lives is made possible with support from The MAP Fund, a program of Creative Capital supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and in part by public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. Tina Satter received a 2014 Doris Duke Impact Award (Theatre).

Tour of Seagull (Thinking of you)


March 25 – 29
Theatre Garonne in Toulouse, France
1, avenue du Château d’eau 31300 Toulouse France

 
March 31 – April 5
T2G – Théâtre de Gennevilliers in Gennevilliers, France
41 avenue Grésillons 92230 Gennevilliers France

 
April 5 – 11
Le Maillon in Strasbourg
Parc des Exposition, 7 Place Adrien Zeller, 67000 Strasbourg, France

 
April 12 – 15
Zagrebačko Kazalište Mladih (ZMK)
the Zagreb Youth Theatre in Zagreb, Croatia
Tesla 7, 10000 Zagreb Croatia

- See more at: http://www.ps122.org/Global/#sthash.BnlZ7509.dpuf

Meredith James "Land Lock"

I am very proud to be a part of this film being presented at the Jack Hanley Gallery March 15 - April 13, 2014.

 

Here is a little about the peice:

Jack Hanley Gallery is pleased to premiere Land Lock; an installation by Meredith James consisting of a video triptych and an anamorphic floor sculpture.

 In the video “Delmar,” James positions a play by Julia Jarcho about two families living in a landlocked small town within a set built to mimic the extreme foreshadowing and warping of space in medieval panel paintings. In Jarcho's play the dialogue itself presents an unstable kind of reality. As roles change and understandings unravel within the plot, James' elaborate and mutable set seems to undulate around the actors. The language vacillates between the surreal and the familial, so too does each room appear visually impossible and then normal.